Opposition

Anti-fracking camp set up near Kirby Misperton shale gas site

kirby-misperton-protection-camp2

Kirby Misperton Protection Camp. Photo: Ian Crane

Opponents of fracking have established a camp near Third Energy’s fracking site at Kirby Misperton in North Yorkshire.

The action follows the rejection by the High Court yesterday of a legal challenge to the granting of planning permission for fracking in the village by North Yorkshire County Council. DrillOrDrop report

Ian Crane, one of the camp’s residents, told BBC Radio York opponents were using land owned by Flamingo Land, the theme park which had previously objected to Third Energy’s plans.

Mr Crane, the presenter of the online show Fracking Nightmare and a former oil executive, said the camp did not have the “express permission” of Flamingo Land. He said:

“We are here to support the local community and raise awareness of what this industry will lead to if it is able to get a foothold.”

kirby-misperton-protection-camp

Photo: Ian Crane

He said there were about a dozen people at the camp this morning and the numbers were expected to increase “fairly significantly” over the next few days. So far, residents have come from places as far apart as Surrey, Cheshire and Lincolnshire.

In a Facebook post, Mr Crane said:

“The Kirby Misperton Protection Camp looks forward to working with the local Community in their quest to protect North Yorkshire from the abomination of Unconventional Gas exploitation.”

kirby-misperton-protection-camp3

Steven Peers interviewed by BBC Radio. Photo: Ian Crane

Another resident, Steven Peers, from Cheshire, was asked by BBC News how long he would stay:

“As long as there’s a threat of fracking to Kirby Misperton, this tiny little village, we’ll be here. We envisage a few months until the licence expires and then we’ll pack up and go.”

This afternoon, Sue Gough, a member of the local campaign group, Frack Free Kirby Misperton, said:

“The camp is up and running but there is still lots to do.

“One of the most important things at the moment is to have as many local people as possible on site throughout each day and we would urge as many of you to come down and say hello.

“The occasional home cooked meal is always gratefully received as well. These wonderful protectors are here to stop fracking taking place and have lots of advice about how we can do it.

“So let’s show Third Energy that they have not won, we said no and we mean it.”

Third Energy’s chief executive, Rasik Valand, said after yesterday judgement that the company had an obligation to prove that it could carry out fracking in a safe, discreet and environmentally sensitive way.

“We are confident that we will prove to the local community that their elected representatives were right to grant this permission.”

It’s not known when Third Energy will start work at Kirby Misperton. The company is continuing to negotiate with North Yorkshire County Council over conditions of the planning permission that must be met before fracking can begin.

A council spokesperson said agreements associated with seven conditions have been approved. Agreements on another two were currently being consulted on and another seven conditions remained outstanding. Decisions are made by council officers under delegated powers.

  • Also last night, anti-fracking campaigners held a demonstration outside the offices of Ryedale District Council in Malton, where the planning committee was meeting to discuss a new minerals plan for the area.
rdc-demonstration-21122016

Photo: Frack Free Ryedale

Updated 22/12/16 with latest information on conditions

 

89 replies »

  1. Sigh… There’s no point arguing with the willfully ignorant. Drag the UK into a backward vision and into an unnecessary, dirty industry and still you will blame us ‘nay-sayers’ when things go wrong, probably. Let me just say ‘I told you so’ in advance. Hold that thought. Even Paul Tresto doesn’t believe fracking will take off in the UK. He just enjoys winding people up it seems.

    • Correct Philip, both the winding up bit and that large scale shale gas production using fracking probably won’t happen in the UK (planning permission, population density, road traffic issues). If the wells are highly productive like Cuadrilla’s well then there may be some development. Also small developments like Third Energy KM to Knapton may also happen. But not large scale US style across the whole of the Bowland Shale basin. I also like to use my industry experience to correct technical comments that are misleading and blatantly wrong. And have we found anyone else on this BB who has actually fracked wells? Not the high volumes of shale fracks but similar in every other aspect operationally.

      I do think that conventional O & G developments will happen, just as they have for the last 60 or 70 years. These are much lower impact and will probably get planning permission. And what is the problem with driling on wllsites that have been there for years or in Industrial sites and old missile bases?

      The big difference these days is FaceTwit social media where untruths, inaccuracies, total BS and some valid stuff can be fired around the world from an armchair in a gas centrally heated living room with gas genearted electricity powering the compute or from a smart phone which has been assembled in some sweat shop in China using materials mined at standards a million miles away from ours….

      I also believe if we are going to replace gas we need something new, we are maxed out on intermittent renewables and until better storage is developed we should draw a line under what we have.

      • Agreed, but your observation about the twit-critics also applies to armchair liars and impatient investors sitting in their comfortable pads elsewhere (eg Washington) with no idea about local communities and conditions here; with not a care in the world about impacts; who just get a kick out of how much power and profit can be extorted from the situation, and how local officials and laws can be bent to their will (sometimes at the highest level) – a game that has been going on for years. Meanwhile in some third world countries people who complain just disappear, that’s how dirty the ff industry gets.

        There’s also a big elephant in the room that you must be well aware of. As a gas-man no doubt you’re fascinated by the flow rates that these shale fracks might achieve but nobody talks about the need to keep drilling and fracking every three months or more to maintain those rates – the fall off (as you know) from any one well is so steep that 75% of the available gas is gone in the first year…. So, new pad sites, new fracks in an ever expanding area from the 1st well, until the landscape gets studded with the things along with the network of pipelines, storage tanks, condensers and so on that have to go with it all.

        To get a good ‘hit’ or flow rate from even one well is to raise hopes in a way that will put even more pressure on locals as the vision of profit and expansion will lead to more and more divisiveness and stress. Communities in the states are deeply divided over the fracking issues, even when they’re netting mineral rights payments – feeling that its all wrong.

        I prefer this English expression ‘why not nip this thing in the bud’? to the Yankee ‘head them off at the pass’ which implies some momentum has built up. Aren’t you being disingenuous by not mentioning this? Isn’t it time to invest in a different kind of future?

        https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/us-energy-storage-market-grew-243-in-2015-largest-year-on-record

        • EURs are getting bigger per well and decline rate is slowing with technology improvements and much longer horizontal wells. This results in less wells required etc. We have discussed this on this BB before.

          Links:

          Click to access marcell.pdf

          (2016 article) The United States and Canada have been driving global shale production. Out of the 15.6 MMboepd produced from shale last year, 99% of the production came from North America. Shale production from this region has proven to be highly resistant to the low commodity prices. One reason shale is surviving in the current price environment is because companies have shifted their exploration focus. When prices were high, shale producers actively explored for the next big play, mainly through drilling exploration wells on new acreages. As the oil price started to drop, producers returned to their core areas. The shift in focus then centered on improving completion techniques and increasing the recovery per well. The impact of this activity is illustrated below. The chart shows the average estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) for oil per well for selected US shale plays split on the quarters the wells started up.

          Average oil EUR per horizontal well. Thousand Boe. (Source: Source: Rystad Energy NASWellCube)

          The chart shows considerable improvements in the production volumes per well, especially in 2015. On average the resource per well increased by 45% from the beginning of 2014 to the end of 2015. For Bakken, the play with the highest oil estimated ultimate recovery, the number increased from 400 Mboe to above 600 Mboe. Meanwhile, Niobrara’s EUR more than doubled during the same period, from 150 Mboe to above 350 Mboe. There are several reasons behind these increased well performances. Companies are targeting the best drilling locations, and are drilling wells with longer laterals and well flow optimization, which accounts for some of this increase. Improved microseismic has also enabled the drillers to perform more efficient well placement, while better completion techniques, such as slick water, have enhanced the fracking process. While well performance improvement has been a key challenge for shale producers over recent years, it is a challenge they have delivered on. This knowledge will be vital when exploration of new acreage starts up again, and will help more basins to be commercial.

          Chart wouldn’t copy paste so you can see it here:

          http://www.geoexpro.com/articles/2016/07/eur-per-well-heading-upwards

      • ‘we are maxed out on intermittent renewables’ has no technical reasoning.

        In 2015 Germany produced 122 TWh from wind and sun.

        In 2015 the UK produced 48TWh from wind and sun

        Germany does benefit slightly from solar over the UK but our wind speeds are far grater.

        These are simple statistics to find from Government sources.

        They are facts not opinions.

        So you are wrong Paul. We are not any way near ‘maxed out on renewables’

        Our grid can take much more than we produce at present but both Germany and the UK will have to invest in grid upgrades to keep moving forward to accept the inevitable high percentage renewable energy future.

        • Have a look at the document in the link below John. The graph on the first page is interesting. Renewables look pretty flat for 2016? Page 8 – gas electrcity generation up up 23%.

          Lots of interesting facts and figures in this Q3 report. Pie chart top of page 9 – why is the huge drop in coal not being replaced by renewables? Because they cannot provide base load.

          I drove past the Caton Moor wind farm outside Lancaster this morning (it is in the FOB AONB). Nice windy day, why were none of the turbines rotating? I don’t know the answer but it is not technical. Could it be that the owners are being paid more not to produce electricity than if they were turning? Yes, it could be, in fact this must be the reason. Crazy or what???

          Click to access Press_Notice_December_2016.pdf

          • Windmills that don’t turn and UK tax payers having to subsidise the fossil fuel industry £6 billion a year. I agree, crazy.

            Next the Conservatives may suggest to pepper the countryside with shale gas wells and use tax payers money to subsidise it at a ridiculously high rate.

            Sounds like a Government who have got everything wrong.

            They don’t get my vote.

            • So it is the Government’s fault? Well vote another party in at the next election. Good luck with that. And whilst shale gas may get canned, the renewables deployment won’t change much – because it just does not work over a certain installed capacity. And we are pretty much there now.

              Surely the fact that wind farms are being paid not to produce electrity (this morning the same) implies that there are too many wind turbines in the mix?

              No point in discussing this now though, lets see where we are in 5, 10 and 20 years time. Perhaps there will have been a significant breakthrough in electricity storage, perhaps we will have a lot more gas storage, we shall have to wait and see.

              • ‘the renewables deployment won’t change much – because it just does not work over a certain installed capacity. And we are pretty much there now’

                You imply we are close to installed capacity, but all the information given to you on this blog says the opposite. Do you not read it, or choose not to? Why is it you hate wind power so much? Have they ‘spoiled’ your view?

                ‘So it is the Government’s fault?’ it’s about political will Paul, you know this too.

                For all your wide selective reading, ‘wisdom’, experience overseas, knowledge and contacts you don’t seem to know much.

  2. As I have said before PhilC, once you are challenged you lose the plot and disappear with nonsense and sarcasm. At least you are consistent. Hope you manage to grow out of it, my children did and I can now enjoy a sensible debate..
    See today they have revised US growth up again, terrible what an unnecessary and dirty industry can do for you. Even ripples out to Grangemouth. Really terrible, it is all going wrong. Did you tell us so about that Philip P? (I remember one of your group telling me that fracked gas could not compete with gas from the north sea-so, I see no ships??) Things could go wrong, well, that’s space exploration binned then.
    Apologies for the sarcasm, it must be catching.

    • Here there be dragons, Apologies for my sarcasm too, but Martin, your post was sarcastic and derogatory from the beginning, and is filled with further sarcasm and silly remarks which have nothing to do with anything other than your personal prejudice. I have no complaints about that, what you say is up to you, but equally so i reserve the right treat it accordingly, so why so hurt?

      • Bit of sarcasm in the debate make things abit more fun and witty remarks at the right time make this debate less political. But no hard feelings or degratory remarks because we are grown up.

    • Agreed, but your observation about the twit-critics also applies to armchair liars and impatient investors sitting in their comfortable pads elsewhere (eg Washington) with no idea about local communities and conditions here; with not a care in the world about impacts; who just get a kick out of how much power and profit can be extorted from the situation, and how local officials and laws can be bent to their will (sometimes at the highest level) – a game that has been going on for years. Meanwhile in some third world countries people who complain just disappear, that’s how dirty the ff industry gets.

      There’s also a big elephant in the room that you must be well aware of. As a gas-man no doubt you’re fascinated by the flow rates that these shale fracks might achieve but nobody talks about the need to keep drilling and fracking every three months or more to maintain those rates – the fall off (as you know) from any one well is so steep that 75% of the available gas is gone in the first year…. So, new pad sites, new fracks in an ever expanding area from the 1st well, until the landscape gets studded with the things along with the network of pipelines, storage tanks, condensers and so on that have to go with it all.

      To get a good ‘hit’ or flow rate from even one well is to raise hopes in a way that will put even more pressure on locals as the vision of profit and expansion will lead to more and more divisiveness and stress. Communities in the states are deeply divided over the fracking issues, even when they’re netting mineral rights payments – feeling that its all wrong.

      I prefer this English expression ‘why not nip this thing in the bud’? to the Yankee ‘head them off at the pass’ which implies some momentum has built up. Aren’t you being disingenuous by not mentioning this? Isn’t it time to invest in a different kind of future?
      https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/us-energy-storage-market-grew-243-in-2015-largest-year-on-record

  3. PhilC -how was my original post sarcastic? Pretty factual actually, but not facts that suit some arguments. But then, your “facts” do not suit my arguments. Do some research on the Humber area and you will find many people have Viking ancestors in that region. (I know a lady who can easily trace her lineage back to a Viking chieftain, all within that area).Travel to Norway and the Faroes and you will find that the Vikings were a very sophisticated trading people, not just raiders. Research the materials they used and where they got them from, and you will find some very interesting information about the climate around the UK at that time. Quite simple, certain trees need certain climates. Remember Hebden Bridge-not that long ago, in the worlds evolution. Just before Harold’s end.

    Or, put more simply, as said to me by a Norwegian who has spent some time in the Artic, “yes, it is a warmer climate in Norway than it has been, but it is also a colder climate than it has been.”

    The link to these two, is oak and pine. Don’t know how to explain that any further, otherwise you will accuse me of patronising you, instead of sarcasm.

    But we digress. Let’s get back to Kirby Misperton. Is this not the same place that residents were reported to say “if Lancashire won’t frack, Yorkshire will”. Is this not the same place where a large number of letters of objection were found to be “manufactured” from outside interests?. Is this not the same place that it was reported that local supporters of the application were facing intimidation on-line? Are these not the same people who largely said that gas extraction in their neighborhood (by the current operators) has been pretty positive with no real issues? No sarcasm, just showing my confusion that all the locals now are being held up as objectors. Because, I do know the Yorkshire mentality well, and they will not be easily moved and certainly not intimidated. And posters about Cancer and Google have already been discredited and are unlikely to convince any Yorkshire person I know. The Yorkshire farmers I know who have added wind turbines on their farms have done so because they are paid crazy money to do so, not for any other reason.

    Time will tell, but I suspect Mr. Crane and some others may be in for a bit of a shock. Brexit plus the Yorkshire mentality will be a very powerful combination. Don’t believe me? Look to the Yorkshire coast, to Sirius Minerals. This huge investment, mining under the Yorkshire National Park obtained permission BECAUSE of local support, with many locals now being shareholders in the project. I have a pretty good idea of what would happen if “outsiders” tried to stop that happening when construction will start next year.

    The weakness for Third Energy is they have yet to offer a financial incentive to the locals, unlike Sirius Minerals. But, if required, they will, I suspect. This is certainly going to be interesting- and, no, I do not bank with Barclays!

    • Good answer, why didn’t you day that the first time? There is still sarcasm here, but hey, better we speak as friends. There is a town not far from where I was born, called Wareham, it is also a Viking settlement and used to be a major Viking port before the estuary silted over and is now only a narrow river. I have several friends there of long Norse ancestry going back to Saxon times, they are small dark very friendly and have the most amazing sense of humour I have ever met. I may have contracted their sense of the ridiculous and shown it above.
      Sorry about that.
      You make some interesting points, so thanks for that. What always strikes me in these posts is that no one point of view is absolutely definative, we all have personal opinions and we all have a right to voice them. I don’t know the definitive answer on the fracking issue, there may not even be one. If you want to see intimidation then look at some of the pro fracking posts on this web site. I may be no angel myself and perhaps I am too used to sarcasm being aimed at me, I shall think about that one. I don’t excuse trolls and nastiness but there are some on these pages that use little else. At the end of the day, and it almost is, we disagree on some things, that is fine provided I don’t enforce my views on you and you don’t impose your views on me. I go back to this time and time again, I don’t think that fracking is worth the environmental risks. You do, that is fine, but as I said, I don’t want fracking to impose its risk on me and in this country, not by ignoring any objection that is proposed. Show me those gold standard regulations and I might listen, but they remain vague and even non existent and I simply don’t trust the industry to self regulate, I have seen the results of that across the world.

  4. We will differ Phil, but I don’t believe in self regulation either. Our country has totally different regulations to the US, and our enforcement record is as good in the oil/gas extraction business as in any other energy generation sector. I have friends and relatives who live very close to oil extraction sites and they do not even know they are there. (I live several miles from a solar farm being installed and put up with thumping from early morning until dark as they drive in the supports, so construction disruption applies to all energy sources.) I don’t expect fracking will deviate from regulation supervision , it will have so much scrutiny it will not be allowed to.
    Horse Hill was promoted by the objectors as a fracking site, although it was regulated to drill below the depth that would allow fracking, even if such a licence had been applied for and granted, which it was not. Gets press coverage but loses support long term. Ineos should use low carbon energy source-gets press coverage but also loses support long term(if anyone has studied basic chemistry.)
    I would suggest that some enforcement of information is required, perhaps that is because when I worked in marketing if you created an issue with the ASA there would likely be a fine and publication of the fact that false data had been used. That meant a P45.
    Yorkshire people certainly do like to call a spade a spade. You tell them it is a fork, and they will tell you what you can do with it! That is my own experience, perhaps the campers have different experience. As I said, time will tell.

  5. Typo problem above-in a rush to watch a TV programme! Obviously, Horse Hill well was drilled ABOVE the level that would have been required for consideration of a permit to frack.

  6. On what basis are you assuming that the fracking processes will be as well, or better regulated in the UK than in the US Martin?

  7. Not assuming at all PhilipP-you can try semantics if you like, but I will not fall in to that at all. One of the classics to watch for when negotiating contracts, and I have been through all the training in that.

    The regulations can be clearly scrutinised. I have done my research, others can do the same. Will those regulations be adequately supervised is perhaps a more valid question? Why would they not? Have we a past problem with that in conventional extraction in UK? Have the tremendous property prices in Poole Harbour been slashed due to the regular oil slicks washing up? Have the nature reserves around that area suffered any problems? I think the smooth snakes and the red squirrels are still thriving.

    I am confident that the level of scrutiny that will apply to UK regulations for fracking will be assured. There is a whole army out there, official and unofficial, who will do so. The permitting process in UK alone takes around 10 times that in the US, and that is not because our people are 10 times more inefficient. You may say, there is no 100% guarantee to my confidence. There never is a total guarantee, but then we will not all be driving electric vehicles in 20 years on that basis.

    Fears will still be created about materials such as bentonite, but if anyone cares to examine that, we should all be vegetarians as it is routinely added to animal feed, and no animal nutritionist assumed it was safe-it has been clearly tested and licensed for such use. It is simply a matter of examining factual information. I have done that and come to my conclusion. Others may do so, and come to another conclusion, and many more (probably) will come to a conclusion without any such examination. That’s life Philip, but please do not try to suggest that all who disagree with your position are making assumptions. Perhaps we walk along a beach at Studland or Blackpool and do not assume, by doing so, we will get cancer. Perhaps we have done our research and realised the two are not connected.

    A different view of it, but perhaps just as valid. Why would the UK regulators/ inspectors be so stupid as to ignore any problems that had been identified within US, and not mitigate against? I equally suspect, faults that were within Chernobyl are now protected against in UK nuclear power stations-but in that case, it is my assumption! So, do we ban Hinkley Point?

    • I’m not interested in semantics Martin, it was a straight question. You seem to imagine that shale fracking is just like conventional extraction and that all the same regulations will apply. Think again. A consultant involved in the Preese Hall drill pointed out that there are no industry specific regulations in this country for shale fracking, but there have been some developments since then. Have you even looked at the official EA risk assessment sheet for fracking operations? The number of risks and hazards are impressive. One of the most quoted references was a set of guidelines used in Colorado several years ago. These are now out of date due to Colorado having tightened and updated its rulings since those were published.

      Also, please don’t fool yourself or others that the chemicals are harmless. Regardless of regulations operators play fast and loose with the rules – accidents happen and gold standard best practices or almost nowhere to be found. Cement seal failures are much higher than the industry admits to and pollution is hardly ever stringently monitored. These are facts Martin, not scaremongering.

  8. I see there is a video on line which shows the subject camp – not too many there? And clearly not wanted by the landowner. As I said in my first post on this article – what a farce!

    A representative of Gordon Gibb (owner of Flamingo Land), threatens to blockade Kirby Misperton Protection Camp … doesn’t he realise we are on his side? Perhaps he doesn’t want you there?

    Send in the manure spreaders again!

    And yes it would appear to be the same Ian Crane – interesting what he up to in America – I wonder if he can still get in there (Ian?).

    • Thanks Paul

      Great radio interview from Mr Crane

      Excellent and informative on the dangers of fracking.

      Nick Grealy comes across a little bit different wouldn’t you say?

      • Yes, thanks for the slip Paul. Ian Crane shows himself to be an a committed and articulate advocate for protecting the parts the UK under threat from fracking. Give the man a medal.

        • Buy some of his infamous DVDs instead, he needs the money more than a medal. Or join him at the Flamingo Land camp. They could do with some more people there – he would appreciate that. The Fylde farmer with the muck spreader needs a minimum number of protectors before he will go over and spray the camp.

          • Sold your soul to the ‘other’ invaders I notice – the ones about to do serious long term damage .

            If those farmers had some foresight they’d be heeding to advice of farmers with informed and appropriate concerns:
            https://www.change.org/p/farmers-and-food-producers-against-fracking
            http://www.fwi.co.uk/news/farmers-condemn-go-ahead-for-fracking-in-lancashire.htm
            http://www.paagainstfracking.org/farms/
            https://secure.foodandwaterwatch.org/site/SPageNavigator/CA_Farmers_Against_Fracking.html
            etc, etc

          • You seem to know a lot about muck spreading Paul? Though looking at the industry you support and the pro fracking posts in these pages I see that is standard practice and used almost exclusively to drown out any protest, verbal or physical.
            But the antis always come up smelling of roses, why is that? It is because Opposition to invasion and aggression will always succeed, it has done before, it is doing so now and will do so in the future. We have been asleep for too long, peace has fooled us into complacency for too long. Now we are awake and we see the danger of this poisonous invasion, the very words you use, the muck spreading as you put it, the hatred and contempt displays the mindset of the invader, the polluter and the despoiler. You see the beauty of this country, you hate it, you hate anything that you cannot own and buy and sell.
            We are not for sale, not for any price, certainly not the price of our environment.
            Your industry is not welcome, it never will be.
            Opposition will never stop, we see you now, we smell you, we do not like what we see, we do not like what we smell. Corruption stinks, it stinks wherever you plant your feet, wherever you bribe politicians and councilors, wherever you drill your hate into our countryside. We know you now, we will never give in.
            You are the extremists, you are the terrorists.
            Merry Christmas

  9. PhilipP-it was not a straight question. You worded the question to try and impose your “intellectual superiority”. Maybe you do it without thinking, but I suspect not.
    Perhaps I should have been less accommodating and simply replied “why do you assume I have assumed anything”, but I was trying to be polite.

    Anyway, have a good Christmas. (Afraid I am off to prepare the sprouts, so will have to turn off the gas fired central heating next week to compensate!)

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