Regulation

Environment Agency confirms another rule change for Cuadrilla’s fracking site

pnr 171025

Preston New Road shale gas site, 25 October 2017. Photo: Used with the owner’s permission

As expected, Cuadrilla has been allowed to dispose of rainwater collecting on its Preston New Road fracking site in a nearby stream.

It had previously been required to send the water by tanker to an offsite treatment centre. But in a statement issued today the Environment Agency said it had agreed to a variation of the company’s environmental permit. The water can now be processed on site and then piped into the Carr Bridge Brook.

Several times last year Preston New Road was photographed with surface water flooding. In April 2017, the Environment Agency told Cuadrilla to improve its surface water management after it breached the permit conditions by allowing water from the site to reach a tributary of the Carr Bridge Brook. DrillOrDrop report

News of the permit change slipped out last month at the inquiry into Cuadrilla’s plans to frack at Roseacre Wood.

The company’s barrister, Nathalie Lieven, told the hearing that the Environment Agency had issued a draft permit for treatment of surface water at Preston New Road. (DrillOrDrop report)

The company said it proposed to apply for a similar permit for the Roseacre Wood site, if planning permission were granted, allowing it to reduce the number of tanker movements.

The EA said in today’s statement:

“Cuadrilla is required to remove and process rainwater that falls on its Preston New Road site and the variation to the permit sets out the conditions that must be followed in order to manage this process.”

We’ve been unable to find details of the conditions or the reasons behind the EA’s decision.

Cuadrilla submitted a 23-document application for the permit variation in December 2017.

It said the proposed treatment plant would use a chemical-free electrocoagulation technology, capable of handling up to 10m3/hour. The company conceded that the process could change the water chemistry but said the discharged water would be monitored.

At the time of the application, Frack Free Lancashire said:

“We are highly disappointed that Cuadrilla appears to be able to move the regulatory goalposts at will. The situation seems to change on a weekly basis as they salami-slice their conditions for their own benefit.”

People who commented on the application complained about the potential impacts on wildlife and water management in surrounding fields.

The application was made days after the EA approved other changes to the permit on the volume of fracking fluid and duration of flaring. DrillOrDrop report

Last month, Cuadrilla applied for a standard rules permit for Preston New Road, described as allowing gasification, liquefaction and refining. The Environment Agency said it was not inviting comments on this application.

28 replies »

  1. The regular flooding around Pnr fracking site was not supposed to happen according to Cuadrilla during the planning application process.
    However local knowledge stated it was that flooding was a regular event.
    Who told the truth?
    Photographic images clearly show it wasn’t the frackers!
    We all know that it wasn’t just rainwater from the sky that caused the recent problems and it wasn’t just rainwater in the fields.
    Multi millions of pounds have been spent cleaning up the Fylde Coast bathing waters. This will probably turn out to be wasted if wastewater from Cuadrillas 100 plus fracking sites is allowed to pass through our watercourses into the Irish Sea!

  2. The regular flooding around Pnr fracking site was not supposed to happen according to Cuadrilla during the planning application process.
    However local knowledge stated it was that flooding was a regular event.
    Who told the truth?
    Photographic images clearly show it wasn’t the frackers!
    We all know that it wasn’t just rainwater from the sky that caused the recent problems and it wasn’t just rainwater in the fields.
    Multi millions of pounds have been spent cleaning up the Fylde Coast bathing waters. This will probably turn out to be wasted if wastewater from Cuadrillas 100 plus fracking sites is allowed to pass through our watercourses into the Irish Sea!

  3. Appalling. Cuadrilla the ‘experts” stated that they knew best, that flooding wasn’t an issue. Cuadrilla was wrong. This “rainwater” clearly is not just clean water, or there would be no need to treat it before discharging into the nearby stream would there? And how detailed will the monitoring be? Will they screen for all possible contaminates, or just some? Will the monitoring be fully independent and carried out to the correct standard? And how well would sites be monitored if we had hundreds or thousands of wells?
    In my opinion this should be a warning to any farmer or landowner in a fracking area, once they are on site the goal posts just keep on getting wider and the risks just keep on getting bigger.

  4. Heaven forbid!

    Exactly the same situation I managed over 40 years ago reference a pig farm! Treat the rain water on site to the necessary standard and then let it flow into the local waterway. I recall it was the preferred solution for the authorities and was relatively inexpensive. Is this not the same type of system used to treat rain water run off from motorways?

    • I think you nailed it Martin when you said ‘the preferred solution for the authorities and was relatively inexpensive’. It’s like our current NHS, have a symptom, take a pill, don’t get to the bottom of the problem, keep treating new symptoms with another pill until you die. Cheap option.

      This governance has demonstrated that life is not important; profit for the few is.

      Am not sure that motorway runoff will contain radioactive materials; not so certain about the poor pigs though…….

  5. As admitted by the EA, it is not just rain water. Superficial aquifer artesian flow that needs to be substantiated , analysed etc etc..

    1 MILLION GALLONS TANKERED AWAY IN 2017.

    Could also be Sherwood aquifer disposal into streams …

    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: Monday, 23 April, 09:23
    Subject: CL83139SR
    To: ‘richard parker’

    Dear Richard
     
    Thank you for contacting the Environment Agency regarding the Preston New Road site.
     
    As your request for information falls under either the Freedom of Information Act or Environmental Information Regulations we must respond to you within 20 working days. 
     
    I have sent your request to the relevant team to answer and will be in touch with you in due course. 
     
    In the meantime you may wish to look at http://www.data.gov.uk to see if the data you have requested is available for you online.
     
    For further information on what you can expect from us and our full service commitment to you, please click this link; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/environment-agency-customer-service-commitment
     
    If you need to contact me in the meantime, please do not hesitate to do so using the details below and quoting reference number CL83139SR.
     
    Kind regards

    Customers and Engagement Officer, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmblnc@environment-agency.gov.uk

     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 19 April 2018 08:07
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL79902SR
     
    Dear Sirs,
     
    Thankyou for your response, highlighting that a considerable amount of the water that was tankered away originated from a result of drilling and could be construed to be ‘waste’ from drilling.

    I suggest that the closed Environmental Agency variation EPR/AB3101MW/V004 needs to be considered to be resubmitted and reopened for consultation as it does not reference this water element either as waste or as supplement to the rain water.
    Clearly some correlation of the recorded water fall, what was tankered away and when needs to be addressed. It seems surprising that the vast quantity of water taken away is solely attributable to water from the shallow aquifer (referred to as artesian groundwater ) just ‘drawn’ in June. I have no concept of the referenced ‘well cellar’ and surrounding drainage ditch being able to retain such vast amounts of water for extended periods and permit a substantial amount of ‘buffering’ of the cited 8 million litres of water.

    I suggest that a resubmitted EPR/AB3101MW/V004 is required with information indicating quantities originating from the shallow aquifer and detail  of the amount of water tankered away in 2017 on a monthly basis, for comment and analysis.
    Also,  future well drilling presumably will be producing more artesian flowback.

    Could you please advise as to the progress and result of this consideration.

    Thankyou, Richard
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: 16 April 2018 10:49
    To: ‘richard_john_parker@hotmail.com’
    Subject: CL79902SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding the Preston New Road site
     
    Thank you for your enquiry which was received on 21 March 2018.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    When there has been a lot of heavy rainfall in Lancashire water gathers on site, this means that the surface water that is contained on the well pad is in fact rain water. The impermeable membrane is designed to hold the rainwater on the well pad which will also retain any spillages safely, preventing the possibility of any environmental harm.
     
    As part of our inspections we check the integrity of the well pad and assess the number of tankers that remove the rainwater. This is to ensure that sufficient capacity is provided for rainwater and the waste surface water is suitable to be disposed of at the designated waste disposal facility.
     
    Along with rainfall, the artesian flow of groundwater experienced when drilling commenced in June last year. This artesian flow of groundwater was stopped in June by casing the well isolating the flow of groundwater. However, whilst this work to stop the artesian flow was being undertaken a substantial amount of groundwater emerged from the well and into the well cellar. In order to empty the cellar, groundwater was pumped into the open drainage ditch on the well pad. From there water was removed by tanker to an off-site waste disposal facility.
     
    For more information about how we regulate the onshore oil and gas industry visit our information page.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmblnc@environment-agency.gov.uk

     
     
     
     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 21 March 2018 14:25
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL73993SR
     
    Dear Sirs,
    Thanks for addressing my enquiry. I was anticipating monthly figures for the removed ‘surface’ water contents but you have kindly inferred that I am looking to determine the water removed from the site following the commencement of drilling until the end of the year.
    The next logical step, which I am sure is you dutiful remit, is to question where some 8 million litres of ‘surface’ water originated. I anticipate this is not all rain water. Is some of the water ingress through the membrane? Is some water directly pumped out of the well during drilling? In either instance is this water likely to be contaminated –  with drilling fluids and pad spillages? If water is ingressing through the membrane, does that suggest any spillages can also migrate downwards into the superficial aquifer?
    I am sure you will investigate and correlate with the request for Cuadrilla to dispose of future ‘surface’ water into Carr Brook.
    Thankyou again for responding to my request.
     
    Richard.
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 12:53:30 PM
    To: ‘richard_john_parker@hotmail.com’
    Subject: CL73993SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding Preston New Road
     
    Thank you for your email dated 13 March 2018 regarding the quantity of surface water that has been removed from the Preston New Road site.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    Our records show that approximately 8,151 tonnes of surface water have been removed from the Preston New Road site. This covers the period 20 June 2017, when the drilling began, until 29 December 2017, when the well pad was completed.
     
    For more information about how we regulate the onshore oil and gas industry visit our information page.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmblnc@environment-agency.gov.uk

     
     
     
     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 13 March 2018 18:04
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL73993SR
     
    Please advise as to the QUANTITIES  of surface water that have been tankered away and processed
    Mr Richard Parker
     
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 10:39:00 AM
    To: ‘richard parker’
    Subject: CL73993SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding the Preston New Road site
     
    Thank you for your enquiry which was received on 26 January 2018.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    Please contact the Met Office for accurate rainfall totals. We are not required to hold this data. Please click the following link which will take you to the Met Office contacts page.
    https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/about-us/contact
     
    Surface water is tested and collected from Preston New Road by permitted waste carrier (using duty of care waste transfer notes) and transported off site as wastewater for treatment and disposal at a suitably permitted site. At the receiving site the surface water is transferred to a bulk storage tank where further testing is carried out prior to treatment and disposal. The wastewater is discharged into the foul sewer under a trade effluent discharge consent. The relevant sewerage undertaker checks compliance with this trade effluent discharge consent. Once wastewater enters the sewer network it mixes with household, commercial and industrial sewage and flows to a wastewater treatment works for treatment. The wastewater treatment works is permitted by the Environment Agency to discharge treated wastewater to a watercourse under a discharge consent setting environmental limits appropriate for the receiving watercourse.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmblnc@environ ment-agency .gov.u k

     
     
     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 26 January 2018 12:50
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL62698SR
     
    Please advise as to the fundamental requirement to the amount of rainwater that is recorded falling on the pad, the amount of surface water that is tankered away and how it is treated. This is needed prior to any attempt at analysing how surface water is ti be treated locally on the pad.
     
    Richard
     
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: 10 January 2018 15:14
    To: richard_john_parker@hotmail.com
    Subject: CL62698SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding the Preston New Road site
     
    Thank you for your enquiry which was received on 1 December 2017. Please accept our apologies for the delay in our response.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    We are only able to reply to your query in respect of the chemistry of the groundwater on this site.
     
    The chemistry of the shallow groundwater is monitored monthly in the four monitoring boreholes at the corners of the site. This information is available on our Citizen Space website. Please see following link:
     
    https://consult.environment-agency.gov.uk/onshore-oil-and-gas/information-on-cuadrillas-preston-new-road-site/
    Information on Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road Site …
    consult.environment-agency.gov.uk
    Overview. Regulation of Cuadrilla’s Site at Preston New Road. We will regularly update this page with information we receive through our audits, site inspections …
     
    There is no requirement for the operator to submit mud logging records to us. However a recently performed audit at Preston New Road looked at the quantity of drilling fluid, drilling muds and surface water removed. This information will be on Citizen Space at the beginning of February 2018.
     
    With regard to your comments regarding Sherwood aquifer, we have nothing further to add to our previous response to you.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmblnc@env ironment-agen cy .gov
    .uk

     
     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 01 December 2017 17:28
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL62698SR
     
    Dear Sirs,
     
    Please could you advise as to the quantities water being removed from the site and the sample results performed on this water. As the environment agency you are responsible for monitoring the extraction and monitoring of both surface, groundwater and associating drilling fluid and returned ‘mud’.
     
    Please  supply the following wrt the frackpad at PNR:-
     
    The chemistry and quantity of the introduced drilling fluid.
    The chemistry and quantity of removed well mud.
    The chemistry and quantity of removed surface water.
    The chemistry and quantity of removed groundwater.
     
     
    The nature of the Sherwood aquifer is clearly beyond your remit as you incorrect inference that by recognising that the “The juxtaposition of the fault is conjectural” and linked statement that the  “transfer across it would appear to be minimal.” Obviously if the location of the boundary is not known, then the transfer across is similarly not known. Water tends to flow along the path of least resistance. Water extracted from a solitary borehole at Roseacre maybe isolated and replenished at a very slow rate. Water could easily flow along different routes from different sources to different destinations under gravity and hydrostatic pressure. The Sherwood under Preston New Road could be feasibly be replenished by a substantial flow. All salinities and flows are indeterministic & conjectural unless monitored.  Please advise if you understand these basic mechanisms.
     
    Richard.
     
     
     
     
     
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: 24 November 2017 11:24
    To: richard_john_parker@hotmail.com
    Subject: CL62698SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding the Preston New Road site
     
    Thank you for your enquiry which was received on 10 October 2017. Please accept our apologies for the delay in our response.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    Cuadrilla hold the information that you have highlighted about the surface water being taken off site by tankers.
     
    The tankers dispose of the surface water at an appropriately permitted waste disposal site. We cannot disclose the exact location of this site.
     
    The operator is responsible for ensuring the safety of the well and the site. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) regulates the working practices adopted by operators. These include the health and safety management of the site, well integrity and reporting of dangerous occurrences. We work closely with the HSE to ensure the environment is protected.
     
    The health and safety regulations require the operator to maintain well integrity throughout the lifecycle of the well. In order to demonstrate this the operator must have robust monitoring arrangements in place.
     
    Operators also have to monitor for any seismic events.  If they were to happen, we would know how large a seismic event it was and where it happened.  From this we would gain an understanding of the potential impact on well integrity. 
     
    In addition, operators will have to monitor well pressure, which would identify if there was a loss of well integrity.
     
    If there is a loss of well integrity following a seismic event of any size, which could pose a risk to the environment, we would require operations to stop.  We would liaise with the Health and Safety Executive, who are the lead regulator in relation to well integrity, and would only allow operations to proceed if the operator could demonstrate that there would be no impact on the environment.
     
    With regards to the water quality within the Sherwood Sandstone, the British Geological Survey (BGS) has undertaken water quality sampling of this aquifer from their borehole at Roseacre Wood. The information is available on their web site at the link below.
     
    http://www.bgs.ac.uk/research/groundwater/shaleGas/monitoring/waterQualityLancashire.html
    Groundwater monitoring in Lancashire | Shale gas …
    http://www.bgs.ac.uk
    There are two significant aquifers across Lancashire: a shallow aquifer formed of superficial glacial sand and gravel interbedded with clay (Figure 1), and a deeper …
     
    Investigation of groundwater quality from the new deep (500 m) borehole into the Sherwood Sandstone at Roseacre Wood has revealed that the groundwater is saline. Samples taken from discrete depths within the open-hole section (356–500 m below ground level) have compositions dominated by sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl).
    For comparison, the Na and Cl concentrations of open seawater are 10,500 mg/L and 19,000 mg/L respectively. This makes the deep Sherwood Sandstone aquifer in this part of the Fylde unviable as a water resource.
    The sampling of this aquifer was not required (in the permit) on the existing location at Preston New Road because this section of borehole is to be cased out and cemented. Plus the information is already available from the BGS borehole.
    The chemistry of the Sherwood sandstone at Rosaecre Wood, would suggest that the water is fairly static, and has become saline to the point of not being useful as a potable source. The juxtaposition of the fault is conjectural, but transfer across it would appear to be minimal.
    The groundwater monitoring information from the 4 boreholes around this site are considered to represent the quality of groundwater within this area. As such no groundwater monitoring has been required under the permit within the main bores of Preston New Road.
     
    We are unaware of any other boreholes under Cuadrilla’s control within 1km of the well pad.
     
    With regard to surface water, Main Drain usually has a tea coloured tinge to it and this is quite normal.  The colour comes from further up the watercourse beyond the confluence with Carr Bridge Brook and on the other side of the M55 motorway. It results from the catchment water upstream draining from the peat deposits around Mythop Moss which pick up the brown colour of the peat.
     
    Cuadrilla sample several of the ponds at the site. The chemistry data we have so far received does not indicate anything unusual about these ponds.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequ ests.cmblnc @environment-agency.g o v.uk

     
     
     
    From: richard parker [mailto:richard_john_parker@hotmail.com]
    Sent: 10 October 2017 12:49
    To: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Subject: Re: CL58141SR
     
    Thank you for the reply:-
     
    I would suggest that the number of tankers leaving the site when it wasn’t raining, suggests that the water was originating from somewhere else. Please advise as to where the information of the number of water tankers leaving the site is recorded, the whereabouts of disposal & if any monitoring of the water was performed.
     
    The Sherwood is neither definitively saline or pure at this point of the file unless it is sampled. Why has it not been sampled. Flow of water in the Sherwood is similarly conjectural. Water could flow at depth across the Woodsford fault where the Sherwood sandstone juxtaposes against itself.
     
    The pollutants from the borehole can migrate when the steel casing erodes or is cracked/distorted by earthquake activity – induced or natural.
     
    Please advise as to where the data of mineral content of the boreholes is available – I can only find the groundwater monitoring data, not the data from the 4 boreholes on the Cuadrilla pad. Also I understand there is another borehole away from the pad to the west – not one of the BGS boreholes, but Cuadrilla controlled – is that correct?
     
    Is the EA aware of discolouration of surface and pond water in the surrounding countryside?
     
    Richard
     
    From: CMBLNC Info Requests
    Sent: 10 October 2017 08:05
    To: richard_john_parker@hotmail.com
    Subject: CL58141SR
     
    Dear Richard
     
    Enquiry regarding the Preston New Road site
     
    Thank you for your emails regarding the above site. Please accept our apologies for the delay in our response.
     
    We respond to requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environmental Information Regulations 2004.
     
    The tankers that you refer to leaving Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road site are removing rain water from a rainwater collection channel on the well pad.
     
    Cuadrilla dispose of the water in these tanks at an appropriately permitted waste disposal site.
     
    The Sherwood Sandstone in this part of the Fylde is unviable as a water resource, including industrial uses. It is considerably more saline than sea water.
     
    The quality of the aquifer significantly varies across Lancashire. This is because of the Woodsfold Fault. This significantly decreases the lateral movement of ground water. The fresher waters are sourced in the east (Preston area), while those to the west are an unviable water source. The dairy at Elswick did not use this aquifer as it was found to be saline.
     
    The potential for using the saline waters from this aquifer has been considered, but we understand that is not being taken any further.
     
    The potential for any pollutants from the borehole to migrate is negated by the insertion of steel casing of various diameters throughout the hole. This steel casing is cemented into the ground, and in effect isolates the bore from the formation at all levels. There is currently no intention to abstract any groundwaters from the Preston New Road Site.
     
    As there is no extraction of waters from the borehole being constructed, there will be no impact on any of the adjacent abstraction boreholes. These are some considerable distance from the Cuadrilla site.
     
    Information from the groundwater quality monitoring (Sands & Gravels) of the Preston New Road site is available on our Citizen Space web site at https://consult.environment-agency.gov.uk/onshore-oil-and-gas/information-on-cuadrillas-preston-new-road-siteinformation-on-cuadrillas-preston-new-road-site.
    Information on Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road Site …
    consult.environment-agency.gov.uk
    Overview. Regulation of Cuadrilla’s Site at Preston New Road. We will regularly update this page with information we receive through our audits, site inspections …
     
    The Oil and Gas Authority and Health and Safety Executive are responsible for allowing changes to the permissible number of vertical wells, laterals and inclination of these lateral wells. This is provided that the operator is covered for these changes in their planning permission.
     
    Please refer to Open Government Licence which explains the permitted use of this information.
     
    Please get in touch if you have any further queries or contact us within two months if you’d like us to review the information we have sent.
     
    Kind regards
     
    Customers and Engagement Team, Cumbria and Lancashire
    Environment Agency | Ghyll Mount, Gillan Way, Penrith 40 Business Park, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 9BP

    inforequests.cmb ln c@environment-agency.gov. u k

     
     
     
     
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    All exposed by FOI request..

    • Excellent reporting Richard, I will read through this again before commenting.
      Thanks for sticking with it.

    • Mr Parker Please stop wasting the time of busy people. You obviously know sweet FA about drilling an oil/gas well!

  6. Why does Cuadrilla need to apply for gasification liquidification and refining? What are these processes for? Dont they just flare off the gas and already have a permit for that. And why so late in applying for permit? Shouldn’t they have that permit before they can start the drilling? Seem very unorganized practice and operation by Cuadrilla management.

  7. OK so this is the preferred method of disposal from just one of the hundred fracking pads targeted by Cuadrilla.
    Who’s going to ensure public safety when the others start work?
    Environment Agency are already unable to keep up with their workload, understaffed and underfunded as they are.
    Our bathing waters, fishing grounds and golden sands are truly threatened.

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